Frontline Florida Realty Blog

Survey: Real estate is the best investment

 

NEW YORK – April 25, 2016 – Americans ranked real estate as the best long-term investment, even over stocks and gold, according to a recent Gallup Poll of about 1,000 U.S. adults. Real estate has been the top investment choice for the past two years, and its lead is increasing over four other popular investment choices.

In the latest survey, 35 percent of Americans selected real estate as their top investment choice compared to 22 percent for stocks and mutual funds, 17 percent for gold, 15 percent for savings accounts/CDs and 7 percent for bonds.

By comparison, 34 percent of Americans said gold was their top long-term investment choice in 2011 and, at the time, only 19 percent said real estate.

"As the average sale price of new homes in the U.S. increased from $259,300 in August 2011 to $348,900 in February of this year, the percentage of Americans picking real estate as the best long-term investment almost doubled," according to Gallup. "During approximately the same time span – from August 2011 to April of this year – gold prices plunged from $1,910 to $1,254 per ounce, and the percentage thinking gold would be the best investment was cut in half."

The poll also found the following:

  • Men are more likely than women to say gold is the best long-term investment. Women tend to favor savings accounts more than men.
  • Survey respondents younger than 30 years old were the least likely age group (26 percent) to think real estate is the top investing choice. They're most likely to choose savings as a top long-term investment choice.
  • Renters (32 percent) and homeowners (34 percent) are almost equally likely to choose real estate as their top long-term investment choice.

Source: Gallup.com

© Copyright 2016 INFORMATION, INC. Bethesda, MD (301) 215-4688

Posted by Alan Martin on April 26th, 2016 8:52 AM

Fla. real estate rebound strongest in nation

 

MCLEAN, Va. – Sept. 25, 2015 – Freddie Mac's latest Multi-Indicator Market Index (MiMi) finds that the Florida real estate market's rebound leads the nation. In a city-by-city comparison, Orlando leads the nation in both a month-to-month and year-to-year comparison, and only one non-Florida city makes the top five list for either timeframe.

Florida comparisons

Month-over-month, Florida's index score rose 2.0 percent. It was followed by Colorado (+1.99%), New Jersey (+1.83%), Connecticut (+1.80%) and Nevada (+1.48%).

Year-over-year, Florida's index grew by 14.35 percent. It was followed by Oregon (+13.45%), Nevada (12.18%), Colorado (+11.65%), and Washington (+10.18%).

Florida metro comparisons

Orlando topped all city lists from Freddie Mac. Month-to-month, Orlando improved 2.6 percent, followed by Greenville, S.C. (+2.55%), Cape Coral (+2.51%), Tampa (+2.19%) and Jacksonville (+2.12%).

Year-to-year, Orlando improved 18.27 percent, followed by Cape Coral (+17.75%), Tampa (+15.99%), Palm Bay (+14.98%) and North Port (+14.77%).

"Florida has some of the most improving housing markets in the country, largely a reflection of more borrowers becoming current on their mortgage payments as the local employment picture improves and house prices rebound," says Freddie Mac Deputy Chief Economist Len Kiefer. "Nationally, all MiMi indicators are heading in the right direction for the second consecutive month and improving more than 6 percent from the same time last year."

U.S. numbers

Nationally, Freddie Mac added one more name to its list of slowly stabilizing markets: Rhode Island. It also added four cities: Philadelphia and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Phoenix, Arizona; and Albany, New York.

The national MiMi value stands at 81, indicating a housing market that is on its outer range of stable housing activity. The number improved 0.93 percent month-to-month and 6.17 percent year-to-year. Since it's all-time low in October 2010, the MiMi has improved 37%.

© 2015 Florida Realtors®

Posted by Alan Martin on September 26th, 2015 1:03 PM

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